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GREATER LONDON INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY

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Book reviews — February 1991

THE INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY AND INDUSTRIAL HISTORY OF SOUTH EASTERN ENGLAND: A BIBLIOGRAPHY. John Greenwood
Kewdale Press, 1990
This is the fourth in the series of bibliographies on the industrial history of this country and covers the counties of Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Norfolk, Oxfordshire, Suffolk, Surrey and East and West Sussex. (London was covered in the third volume published in 1988). The other earlier volumes covered Northern England — now out of print — and The Midlands. It contains 5,151 references to the industrial history of the area and excludes no industries except banking and finance, entertainment and retailing. Judging by reviews of earlier volumes this is an important contribution to the work of industrial archaeologists in SE England and is to be supported. However at £39.00 or £38.30 direct from Kewdale Press, 2 Partridge Piece, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 OBP, I suspect it is something many of us will consult in a reference library rather than purchase. BILL FIRTH

The latest book list from Leicester University Press, Archaeology, Early and Medieval History, includes two books which seem worth mentioning:

POST MEDIEVAL ARCHAEOLOGY IN BRITAIN, (1500-1800). David Crossley
Sheffield Univ. 288 pages, £40.00
Part Four: Industry, covers textile manufacture, extractive industries, glass, ceramic industries, secondary industries, power and transport.

WORK IN TOWNS. 850-1850. Editors, Penelope J. Corfield and Derek J. Keene
Institute of University of London, 250 pages. £25.00
This contains 12 specially-written essays which between them analyse the history of work in towns. Issues covered include the nature and definition of urban work, the interpretation of fragmentary material evidence, the role of women and the growth of suburbs. BILL FIRTH

AUGUSTUS PUGIN VERSUS DECIMUS BUXTON — A VICTORIAN ARCHITECTURAL DUEL. By Guy Williams
Published by Cagsells at £17.95
A newly published book of interest to architecture students. There was a long article about the book in The Review section of The Weekend Telegraph on Saturday 5th January. The writer, Tom Rowland, made the book sound very desirable. JUNE GIBSON

THE THAMES: A HISTORY FROM THE AIR. By Leslie Banks and Christopher Stanley
192 pp. 150 colour plates. Price £16.95. Published by Oxford University Press
The River Thames has played an important, role in Britainís history ever since manís earliest times. In this book Leslie Banks and Christopher Stanley provide an aerial view of the riverís history, revealing many aspects which arc hidden from the observer at ground level, as well as giving a fresh perspective on much that is familiar.

The volume contains 150 colour photographs, chosen from the most varied and informative private collection of aerial photographs of the Thames in existence, built up by the authors over a period of fifteen years. Reproduced here are some unique documents, such as photographs of archaeological sites that have been visible for only one day during the last decade and may never show up again. From the air, previously undiscovered prehistoric burial sites and Roman villas can suddenly be revealed as outlines in a field of ripening corn.

Other photographs are designed to show the landscape and geography of the areas through which the river flows. Patterns of settlement are illustrated by towns and villages along its course and there are fascinating views of the changing face of London, including recent developments in the Docklands. Passing bridges, historic houses, castles, forts and such modern defence systems as the Thames Barrier, this journey in time will stimulate and delight all those with a love of the river and an interest in its history.

Essential for: General readers, students of history, geography, inhabitants of towns and villages along the Thames and tourists.

MOVING MILLIONS
From the London Transport Museum shop. Price £9.95 in paperback, and £14,95 hardback
MOVING MILLIONS, a new book from London Transport, marks the centenary of the worldís first electric tube railway with a nostalgic look at the bygone age of public transport and a few suggestions for improvement that could be made now. The City and South London Railway was opened by the Prince of Wales, later Edward VII, on November 4th 1890. The book recalls those early days fondly, with plenty of illustrations. But nostalgia for trams trundling up and down Highgate Hill does not obscure the authorís concern for the current state of London Transport. Professor Theo Barketís constructive criticism should come as music to the disgruntled commuterís ear. Professor Barker, 67, is Professor Emeritus of Economic History at London University and a lecturer at the London School of Economics. He is the co-author of the definitive history of London Transport. From: The Ham & High. 9/11/90


© GLIAS, 1991