GLIAS

GREATER LONDON INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY

Home | Membership | News | Diary | Courses | Noticeboard | Books | Links | Database | e-papers | Contact

Book reviews — April 1985

SUSSEX INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY. A Field Guide. Edited by Brian Austen, Don Cox and John Upton on behalf of the Sussex IA Society
Pp. 99. Phillimore S Co. 1985. Limp covers £3.95
This is the latent of this publisher’s books on IA and represents the results of many years work by the Sussex IA Society. In addition to the editors, fourteen contributors are named. According to the publisher’s blurb, it covers every known site or structure in East or West Sussex that is accessible to the public or viewable from a public right of way. This is clearly a nonsense. More realistically the introduction claims the listing of the most significant industrial monuments. The book is what it claims to be — a field guide — and as such it will be invaluable to anyone investigating IA in Sussex. Would there were more guides as good as this one and as reasonably priced.

INDUSTRIAL HISTORY FROM THE AIR. Kenneth Hudson
Pp. 139. Cambridge University Prees. 1984. Hard covers £12.95
This is the latest in the Cambridge Air Surveys series of historical sites viewed, from the air. In his preface Kenneth Hudson gives his reasons for choosing the title as ‘Industrial History from the Air’ rather than ‘IA from the Air’. Personally I think he is justified — there is more of history than archaeology in the book. There is however, much of interest. Aerial photographs of sprawling sites, be they quarries, factories, ports, railway complexes or airfields do help to put such large areas into perspective. Other pictures help in the interpretation of abandoned sites where the evidence on the ground has largely disappeared. This is the sort of book which one needs to browse through to decide if it covers enough of one’s own interests to merit purchase. Bill Firth


© GLIAS, 1985