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GREATER LONDON INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY

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Book reviews — February 1982

East London Record No. 4, 1981
Price 75p + 25p p&p, from the East London History Society, c/o Alan Searle, 67 Fitzgerald Road, E11 2GT
As well as the 1980 issue reviewed in our last Newsletter, the 1981 volume of this well-produced journal is now available. Its 50 pages include an account of the domestic economy of Bethnal Green in the last quarter of the 19th century, when outwork was still carried on extensively in people's homes.

Garden History Review No. 9, 1981
Available from Camden History Society Publications, 28 Willoughby Road, London NW3 1SA, for 1 + 18p postage.
It contains a very useful article by Isobel Watson on Model Houses for the Working Classes in Victorian Camden, where "Five Per cent Philanthropy" first became established in the 1840s. The first purpose-built five-storey flats in London were completed in 1847 and the earliest to survive are those of 1850 in Streatham Street, near the British Museum. The story is carried through to the early LCC and St. Pancras Borough Council flats of the 1900s. Malcolm Tucker

FAIRS FAIR
In her justified commendation of 'The First Public Railway' in the December newsletter Brenda failed to mention the publisher. Brian Salter's Living History Publications deserves a bouquet for making such good things available. Now Brian and I are co-operating on the next Living History publication - the story of the Croydon Canal. Philip Daniell

Industrial Archaeology in Belgium
175 Belgian Francs from Luc Cocquyt, Lange Booingaardstraat 17, B-9000 Gent, Belgium
Our friends at the VVIA have just issued their first publication: Industrial Archaeology in Belgium. 70 pages in English, French and Flemish covering the wide variety of IA those of us who have been there know exists from coal mining at Limburg to textile mills and industrial housing in Gent. Illustrated and with a map showing locations of sites mentioned, a must for anyone interested in Belgian IA.

The Power of Steam, an Illustrated History of the World's Steam Age by Asa Briggs
208pp 10.50 Michael Joseph 1982 (Hot from the press!)
Starting with Newcomen's precursors and ending with the steam preservation movement and dealing with the subject as an international phenomenon! (as of course, is almost all technological development) Lord Briggs' text is at times reminiscent of Francis Klingender's masterpiece 'Art and the Industrial Revolution', but they are not really comparable. 'The Power of Steam' is something of a pot boiler and not strikingly original (the author repeatedly pays tribute to L.T.C. Rolt). The book does contain some fine photographs, especially of people at work. Kenneth Brown was the photographic consultant, GLIAS member Colin Bowden contributed some excellent pictures of stationary steam engines and there are railway locomotives in colour by Colin Garratt (the David Attenborough of railway enthusiasts), plus illustrations from the Elton Collection. Bob Carr


© GLIAS, 1982