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GREATER LONDON INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY

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Book reviews — August 1978

‘Hand-made in London’ by Andrew Lawson
Published by Cassell (1978) at £8.95
Andrew Lawson’s book describes the wealth of talent that exists in London in numerous small workshops and also in larger firms. He had covered the whole range of craft industries - metal working, wood working, musical instrument makers, books and printing, instrument makers, glass workers, sculptors and many others such as a swordstick maker, a tennis racket stringer and a grainer & marbler. Many of the firms described, such as Broadwoods, W.T. Morell and Whitefriars, will be familiar to GLIAS members. The book is illustrated throughout with fine photographs and the text illuminated by comments from the craftsmen, including the copper-plate engraver who says "If you ask me, engraving is only good for the halt, the blind and the daft. I’m thinking of giving it up and. getting a job" J Andrew Lawson does not romanticise the craft industries; he brings out the problems as well as the rewards. There is a useful directory at the back. See that your local library gets this book. Hugh Marks

‘Vanishing Street Furniture’ by Geoffrey Warren
1978. Published by David & Charles at £7.50
Many GLIAS members have waited a long time for a book on street furniture as recent correspondence on cast iron loos has demonstrated. This book covers the development of street lighting, drinking fountains, milestones, coalhole covers, etc. Unfortunately, it may not be quite the book we have been waiting for. The subjects are all there, the pictures are interesting, the information can be fascinating, but it can also be very inaccurate. A quick reading of the text produced many things that are positively wrong to my limited knowledge of the field, e.g. Sir Joseph Bazalgette! There is no complete study of coal duty posts - what about GLIAS member Martin Nail’s complete published study? The captioning of the plates is poor: Plate 3, Roupell Street, should be SE1 and plate 75 shows a "real silver Napoleonic cannon" on the corner of Brewer Street, SW1. The cannon clearly shows its cast parish name and the typical square base of a mock cannon bollard. We need a book on this subject, but we also need facts we can trust. Use this book for reference in the library only. Dave Perrett

‘Guide to Light Railways, Steamers, Aircraft & Industrial Preservation’
Enlarged 1978/9 edition of 72pp, 14 illustrations, 400 entries is available from the publishers Avon & Anglia Publications & Services, 9 Poplar Avenue, Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol, BS9 2BE for 75p + 14p postage & packing
This is the 16th edition of this publication giving location, description, access, facilities and opening/operating periods for preserved railways (including main light railway timetables), aircraft, shipping, canal and IA sites.


© GLIAS, 1978