GLIAS

GREATER LONDON INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY

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Book reviews — June 1972

Rickmansworth Historian, Autumn 1971
Obtainable, 11p including postage, from 18 Pheasant's Way, Rickmansworth, Herts.
This publication appears twice yearly; this issue contains a short history of Hamper Mill and Wiggenhall, a good factual account of the Rickmansworth Branch Canal, a short article on Franklin & Sons, Mineral Water Manufacturers, and a list of prints of old Watford, including ones of the Market Hall and canal.

Britain's Railways: An Industrial History, by Harold Pollins
David and Charles. 3.15
This general view of the economics of British railways from their origins to the late 1960s contains a great deal of unusually precise material in a brief compass. The book has 22 tables and 4 maps.

The Cloth Industry in the West of England from 1640 to 1880, by J. de L. Mann
Oxford University Press. 3.50
The old cloth districts of the West Country were for a long time the major part of Britain's once greatest industry. This book shows the numerous differences in the experience of Gloucester, Wiltshire and Somerset and gives insights into the problems of change, such as the opposition of the workers to the introduction of the spinning jenny, and the inadequacies of early machinery. There are informative sections on raw materials and the nature of manufacturing processes, and comprehensive figures for cloth exports, dimensions and weights of various qualities of cloth, numbers of hands employed in the different processes, wages, etc.

Industrial Archaeology: an Historical Survey, by Arthur Raistrick
Eyre Methuen. 5.50.
Here the author examines the scope of I.A. from the days when prehistoric craftsmen began to mine flint on a commercial scale. The book is divided into three sections. The first deals with the raw materials, the second covers the British Industrial scene from the axe manufacturers of the Neolithic Age to the 19th century, and the third discusses the functions of museums and private collections and the problems of preservation, restoration and display.


© GLIAS, 1972